Sneak Peek: Signs and Seasons

Next week is the opening of Margaret Adams Parker’s solo exhibition, Signs and Seasons (and also the Press Room Mini Solo In My Nature by Robin Gibson).  Saturday is the opening reception as well as the artist talk by Margaret Adams Parker.  In case you missed it in the Spring Newsletter, here’s a reprint of part of the article on this upcoming show:

ParkerImage2As I write this in early February I am lamenting – through two complex images – the frailty of advanced age.  Sunt lacrimae rerum is printed from an assemblage of 14 etched plates: five of them are based on drawings of my mother’s decline; the other nine “spacers” are darkened with dots and jagged lines – like the tangle of her mind.  Et mentem mortalia tangent pairs an etching of my mother with one of a man who is elderly but still alert.  I am experimenting with different arrangements and may possibly include counterproofs in the final composition.  The counterproof impression – a pale (and reversed) version of the etching- seems an apt metaphor for the losses that come with aging.  (The titles for these works are taken from Virgil’s Aeneid, Book 1:462, where Aeneas weeps as he stares at murals picturing his comrades lost in the Trojan War:  “Here are tears for things, and thoughts of mortality touch the mind.”)

ParkerImage3But all is not lament.  I am eager to work on more joyous images:  a fiddler playing jigs with his band; three young women sharing photos on the subway; my granddaughters.

In the etchings of the natural world, I depict the skeletal remains of once flourishing life:   ancient trees, fading leaves, bones, and seed pods.  But I couple these with images of new birth.  Signs and Seasons, the work that gives the show its title, celebrates the improbable return of life to a tree wrenched apart by a storm.  To accompany this work I have written a poem (an entirely new endeavor for me), reflecting on new life out of death…[this poem makes] explicit the commonality that I see between seasons in our lives and in the natural world, the words forming a bridge between these two parts of the show.

You can read Peggy’s poem, as well as see her etchings, sculpture, and drawings, May 1-26.  The opening reception is Saturday, May 4, 1-4 pm.

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