Tag Archives: international exhibition

Reception Photos (Part 2): Celebrating Our South African Voices Exhibition

On Saturday, January 11, WPG hosted a well-attended exhibition reception for our current show, South African Voices: A New Generation of Printmakers. During this event, guests surveyed prints by the nearly 40 emerging artists who contributed to the exhibition. Below, you will find our second set of several photos from this reception. There are three days left for this exhibition, so make sure you come by the gallery to take a look (if you haven’t already)!

Another view of the South African Voices exhibition marquee and some prints included in the show.

Another view of the South African Voices exhibition marquee and some prints included in the show.

Vula Amehlo Executive Director Anne Gordon (left) with artist Cynthia Farrell Johnson.

Vula Amehlo Executive Director Anne Gordon (left) with artist Cynthia Farrell Johnson.

South African Voices: A New Generation of Printmakers | Jan. 11 Exhibition Reception

South African Voices: A New Generation of Printmakers | Jan. 11 Exhibition Reception

Kate Maynor, Chief Paper Conservator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (left), and Amy Alderfer (right).

Kate Maynor, Chief Paper Conservator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (left), and Amy Alderfer (right).

WPG member Rosemary Cooley admires a South African Voices print by John Taouss Tuyisabe.

WPG member Rosemary Cooley admires a South African Voices print by John Taouss Tuyisabe.

South African Voices: A New Generation of Printmakers | Jan. 11 Exhibition Reception

South African Voices: A New Generation of Printmakers | Jan. 11 Exhibition Reception

Anne Gordon, Executive Director of Vula Amehlo Art Development (far left), provides a tour of the exhibition to South African Ambassador to the United States Ebrahim Rasool (second from left); to Ambassador Rasool's wife Roseida Shabodien (third from left); and to Christine Mullen Kreamer, Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (far right).

Anne Gordon, Executive Director of Vula Amehlo Art Development (far left), provides a tour of the exhibition to South African Ambassador to the United States Ebrahim Rasool (second from left); to Ambassador Rasool’s wife Roseida Shabodien (third from left); and to Christine Mullen Kreamer, Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (far right).

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Reception Photos (Part 1): Celebrating Our South African Voices Exhibition

On Saturday, January 11, WPG hosted a well-attended exhibition reception for our current show, South African Voices: A New Generation of Printmakers. During this event, guests surveyed prints by the nearly 40 emerging artists who contributed to the exhibition. Below, you will find several photos from this reception, with more to come on Friday. This is the final week for the exhibit, so make sure you come by the gallery to take a look (if you haven’t already)!

A view of the South African Voices exhibition marquee and some prints included in the show.

A view of the South African Voices exhibition marquee and some prints included in the show.

Anne Gordon, Executive Director of Vula Amehlo Art Development (far left), pictured with South African Ambassador to the United States Ebrahim Rasool (second from left); Ambassador Rasool's wife Roseida Shabodien (third from left); and WPG member artist Rosemary Cooley (far right).

Anne Gordon, Executive Director of Vula Amehlo Art Development (far left), pictured with South African Ambassador to the United States Ebrahim Rasool (second from left); Ambassador Rasool’s wife Roseida Shabodien (third from left); and WPG member artist Rosemary Cooley (far right).

Two prints by South African Voices exhibition artist Phillip Mabote.

Two prints by South African Voices exhibition artist Phillip Mabote.

Nando's Peri Peri of Silver Spring very graciously donated the delicious food that exhibition guests enjoyed during the afternoon.

Nando’s Peri Peri of Silver Spring very graciously donated the delicious food that exhibition guests enjoyed during the afternoon.

Christine Mullen Kreamer, Deputy Director and Chief Curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (far left), along with WPG member artist Rosemary Cooley (center); and WPG Director Damon Arhos (far right).

Christine Mullen Kreamer, Deputy Director and Chief Curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (far left), along with WPG member artist Rosemary Cooley (center); and WPG Director Damon Arhos (far right).

Dr. Raoul (far left) and Judy (far right) Wientzen with Cecilia Rossey (center).

Dr. Raoul (far left) and Judy (far right) Wientzen with Cecilia Rossey (center).

A welcoming atmosphere accentuated by vibrant flowers and textiles.

A welcoming atmosphere accentuated by vibrant flowers and textiles.

Intern Perspectives: The Listening Room

Today  we have a talk by the artists and refugees involved in The Listening Room: Refugee Arts Project, at 4 pm, followed by a special presentation by Playback Theatre.  Want to know more? Read summer intern Oliver’s impressions of the exhibition and stop by this afternoon!

The Listening Room, Refugee Art Project, curated by Sally Brucker was a collaborative effort, by seven artists, one poet, and eight refugees from different countries. Each refugee was paired with an artist who listened to their story and created from it a work of art to share the refugee’s unique experiences and shared connections. Set apart from the rest of the gallery, it is as if you are stepping into a small world filled with the sounds and stories of these displaced persons. Each artist offers a unique lens for the refugees’ experiences to be shared through, creating a distinctive conversation between the experiences of all partaking in this project.

Installation shot of the untitled work by Nicole Salimbene

Installation shot of the untitled work by Nicole Salimbene

In Untitled, by Nicole Salimbene, the story of a refugee named Fetunwork was conveyed through a painting of clustered buildings that was severed down the middle and loosely sewn back together. Salimbene highlights the space we can reach within ourselves when we remove ourselves from the distraction of the outside world and just listen. The buildings were collaged with clippings from advertisements and images of windows, creating a juxtaposition between the consumer culture and modern designs of the magazines, and the earth-toned simplistic buildings and laundry lines. To the right, Kian’s Prayer, by Pauline Jakobsberg, Viola’s story is told through a mix of bright and muted colors, with snippets of conversations scrawled across the painting. The contrasting colors convey the conflict between the activities and joy in Kian’s day-to-day life, and the sorrow of his mother learning to live in such a foreign place and culture. The painting features a dress, harkening to some of Jakobsberg’s other works, and creates a link between the artist and the storyteller.

Leaning against the other wall, Memory, by Sally Brucker, encapsulates a photo from Manijeh’s wedding day. Manijeh is drawn in the middle, flanked by her mother and mother-in-law, and layered in textured fabrics. Manijeh is wearing a traditionally western wedding dress, where as the women standing beside her are garbed in traditional chador coverings. Manijeh sewed the threads used in the artwork herself, and wrote the poem in farsi on her dress, and there are passport images of Manijeh in her mother-in-law’s clothing. To the left, Searching, by Terry Svat, conveys how Abourass kept his faith in God through the all of the pain brought on by his long journey from Darfur . The painting features a sand-colored background, with small, earth-toned figures to symbolize the trampled earth, and a cross cut from the background to show his lasting faith in God. Svat bound the painting in a cross made of twine with plaster cast hands holding it on either side. This was her way of holding the piece together, but it also shows how Abourass was able to hold it together through his faith in God.

More from Vula Amehlo: Painting Marikana’s Tragedy

We wanted to share this link from The Daily Maverick–it’s an article from November 2012 in which artist Lehlohonolo Dhlamini, one of the artists affiliated with Vula Amehlo, was interviewed.  Dhlamini painted a series of watercolors dealing with the Marikana Massacre, where police retaliation against a mining strike left 34 dead.  You can read more about the event, and the artist’s reaction to it, at the link above.

Coming in 2014: South African Printmakers

"The Comfort That I Know" by Bambo Sibiya

“The Comfort That I Know” by Bambo Sibiya

Untitled screenprint by Mini Ngoyi

Untitled screenprint by Mini Ngoyi

We’re super excited to announce a partnership with Vula Amehlo Art Development in Johannesburg, which will bring the art of emerging South African Printmakers to WPG in January 0f 2014, making it our third international exhibition in four years.  “Vula Amehlo” means “open your eyes” in Zulu and other South African indigenous languages, and focuses  on promoting the careers of emerging artists through curating exhibitions in both traditional gallery spaces and in other environments, and marketing their work in South Africa and elsewhere.

Their latest exhibition, Afrika Rea Bolela (Afrika Let’s Talk): ARTiculating the Constitution, just wrapped up at the end of last month.  It presented the work of 20 South African artists from the Bataki Kollective, with the aim of stimulating discussion among the artists and between the artists and the  viewers regarding how their art can reflect on the values that are embodied in the South African Constitution, especially the Bill of Rights and in the mission of Constitution Hill (where the exhibition was presented).

"A part of Me" by Mbali Dhlamini

“A part of Me” by Mbali Dhlamini

We’re still not sure exactly which artists will be participating, so the images included with this post are just a taste of some of the wonderful emerging talent in and around Johannesburg.  We hope we’ve whetted your appetite for more-so stay tuned as this project and exhibition are further developed!